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How To Measure Your Pool Room

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How To Measure Your Pool Table

If you have made the exciting decision to get a pool or billiard table, it’s important to know that you will have enough space for it. Not only to fit the table itself, but to also play around it properly with ample cue space to take your shots.

When working out which size pool table is appropriate for your room, there are a few things you need to take into consideration. Below are some charts outlining the minimum required space, pending the size of your pool table and cues.

A 7 Foot Pool Table has a playing area of 1,120mm x 2,030mm
  • If using a 4 foot cue, you need at least 3.4 metres x 4.5 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.5 foot cue, you need at least 3.7 metres x 4.8 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.8 foot cue, you need at least 3.9 metres x 5.0 metres clear space around the pool table.
An 8 Foot Pool Table has a playing area of 1,120mm x 2,335mm
  • If using a 4 foot cue, you need at least 3.6 metres x 4.8 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.5 foot cue, you need at least 3.9 metres x 5.1 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.8 foot cue, you need at least 4.1 metres x 5.3 metres clear space around the pool table.
A 9 Foot Pool Table has a playing area of 1,270mm x 2,640mm
  • If using a 4 foot cue, you need at least 3.7 metres x 5.1 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.5 foot cue, you need at least 4.1 metres x 5.4 metres clear space around the pool table.
  • If using a 4.8 foot cue, you need at least 4.2 metres x 5.6 metres clear space around the pool table.

Dealing with Obstructions

Smaller rooms or rooms with beams are a common drama with most rooms. There are a few ways to get around these problems without compromising play.

Try and position the table with the obstruction at the side of the table and not the ends. If it must be at the end, try and keep it at the break end of the table you break from, not at the ‘foot’ or the ‘rack’ end. Many more shots are played from the ‘rack’ end. As for break shots, the cue ball can generally be positioned away from most obstructions.

Shorter cues are also commonplace if there is an unavoidable obstruction in a particular position. These cues can be as short as 3 foot in length and will certainly remove the hassle of an obstruction.

Even if you do have an obstruction, you can still have a great time! Try adding some ‘House Rules’ around the obstruction. These would apply for all players and if anyone gives you grief, the “My House – My Rules” option applies well here!

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